Rabbi

Rabbi

Judaism is teshuvah and tikkun; returning to your true nature as a manifesting of God, and restoring the world with justice and compassion. Judaism calls for revolution or it calls for nothing at all. Jews are or l’goyyim, a light unto the nations (Isaiah 49:6), or we are irrelevant. Our vision is of a fearless world without war (Micah 4:3–4) where people eat simply, drink moderately, work joyously, and love freely (Ecclesiastes 2:24; 4:8–12). Our path is the iconoclasm of lech lecha: freeing ourselves from the conditioning that keeps us from being a blessing to all the families of the earth, human and otherwise (Genesis 12:1–3). Our pedagogy is eilu v’eilu (Eruvin 13b), honoring argument, doubt and critical thinking over intellectual passivity, spiritual conformity, and manufactured consent. Our tools are Shabbat, liberating all beings from Mitzrayim, the narrow places of enslavement, and helping them reclaim their innate divinity (Deuteronomy 5:15; Exodus 20:8-10); kashrut, elevating manufacturing and consuming to the highest ethical and environmental standards; tzedakah, the just use of money and capital; chesed, practicing lovingkindness; shmirat halashon, cleansing our speech of gossip, slander, falsehood, and distortion; b’rachot, expressing gratitude for life’s gifts and wonders; limmud, studying our ancient texts in search of timeless wisdom; and tefillah, exploring the nature of self and other to reveal Ehyeh, the singular divine I manifesting all existence. A Jew is defined by her or his commitment to Judaism (however understood) rather than blood. Our challenge is to teach our children to invent the future and not preserve a frozen and romanticized past. If we are not about tomorrow we will find that we have none.